Security Training

What is a Door Supervisor?

A Door Supervisor has, to provide a safe, pleasant atmosphere for anyone using the venue on which he or she works. The Door Supervisor is the first, and in many cases the only, member of security that a customer will encounter and, as such, their job is to deter people who may pose a problem once on the premises from entering in the first place – but to do so in such a way as to not put off genuine customers who are just looking to enjoy their evening. This role is important in terms of protecting customer relations.

Much of a Door Supervisor’s role is quite straightforward – in the first instance it is about make sure that premise policy and the law on admissions are implimented. This entails turning away people who fail to meet dress code requirements or the venue’s minimum age. For those customers who meet requirements for entry, the door supervisor should greet them politely on their arrival and wish them a good evening on their departure. They also need to see that fire safety requirements, such as maximum occupancy and emergency exits, are stuck to SIA training is directed at seeing that they can do this.

As not all troublemakers are immediately apparent prior to entry, a doorman must also see to it that should trouble increase inside the venue, the people responsible are identified and dealt with in the correct manner, using only force which is necessary, and that those incidents that take place are documented as soon as they are fully dealt with. Company drugs policy and the standard times up period are also within the doorman’s remit, and they also have to ensure that at the end of the evening all customers leave the venue in an safe, calm & orderly fashion, checking the toilets and cloakrooms afterwards to ensure that no-one has been left behind. SIA training is designed to cover all of these elements.

The doorman’s role, in short, is to make sure that order is maintained on the premises where they work, and the relevant SIA qualifications are intended to see to it that anyone applying for the role of doorman is fully conversant with the way in which this role is upheld. To this end, the SIA training course for a doorman deals with a range of subjects that prepare the individual seeking a qualification to perform the role to its optimum level. This spread of subjects is more extensive than people who believe the old “bouncer” cliché would expect.

The course extends to twenty-eight classroom hours and two hours of exams. The 28 hours of classroom work are split into two halves of fourteen hours, the first unit being entitled “Role and Responsibilities of Door Supervisors in the Security Industry Environment”. This unit deals with all the hypothetical considerations of someone wishing to work as a doorman. Beginning with an introduction to the role, and to the leisure and security industries in which they will work, this part of the course also entails another ten modules, all of which combine to give a full comprehension of the legal requirements, responsibilities and entitlements which fall upon a doorman. These are as follows:

Standards of Behaviour – a lesson in the reasons why standards are important, and an understanding of what the SIA requires in this respect;

Civil and Criminal Law – an understanding of both subjects, the definition of reasonable/ necessary force, the different types of assault and other criminal offences a doorman may have to deal with, and options for action resulting from these;

Searching – a coverage of the reasons and methods for searching individuals and property, entry requirements, the definition of the term “offensive weapon”, the potential hazards of carrying out a search and procedures should an item be found

Arrest – defining why, when and how an arrest should be made, the limitations on a doorman’s powers in this regard and what should result from an arrest

Drugs Awareness – identifying signs of drug misuse, recognising symptoms of drug abuse, listing names of illegal drugs and signs of drug-dealing, procedures for dealing with contravention of drugs policy

Recording Incidents and Crime Scene Protection – why, when and how incidents should be recorded, different types of evidence and how to preserve a crime scene

Licensing Law – knowledge of the law relating to refusal of entry and ejection, police powers, different types of licence and the licensing law as it relates to young people, drunkenness, disorder, prostitution and unlawful gaming

Equal Opportunities – awareness of issues surrounding equality, prejudice and stereotyping, and legal acts to prevent this

Health and Safety – awareness of existing legislation in this area, responsibilities of employer and employee, hazard identification, prevention of injury or AIDS contamination

Emergency Procedures – how to define an emergency, fire safety, bomb scares and first aid procedure

The second part of the course deals with communication skills and conflict resolution – although this is often seen as the doorman’s true job, this unit of the course deals with extraordinary situations which tend to be very rare on an average evening in well-guarded premises – such as violent disorder. SIA training in this respect deals with the theory of conflict prevention

A Door Supervisor has, to provide a safe, pleasant atmosphere for anyone using the venue on which he or she works. The Door Supervisor is the first, and in many cases the only, member of security that a customer will encounter and, as such, their job is to deter people who may pose a problem once on the premises from entering in the first place – but to do so in such a way as to not put off genuine customers who are just looking to enjoy their evening. This role is important in terms of protecting customer relations.

Much of a Door Supervisor’s role is quite straightforward – in the first instance it is about make sure that premise policy and the law on admissions are implimented. This entails turning away people who fail to meet dress code requirements or the venue’s minimum age. For those customers who meet requirements for entry, the door supervisor should greet them politely on their arrival and wish them a good evening on their departure. They also need to see that fire safety requirements, such as maximum occupancy and emergency exits, are stuck to SIA training is directed at seeing that they can do this.

As not all troublemakers are immediately apparent prior to entry, a doorman must also see to it that should trouble increase inside the venue, the people responsible are identified and dealt with in the correct manner, using only force which is necessary, and that those incidents that take place are documented as soon as they are fully dealt with. Company drugs policy and the standard times up period are also within the doorman’s remit, and they also have to ensure that at the end of the evening all customers leave the venue in an safe, calm & orderly fashion, checking the toilets and cloakrooms afterwards to ensure that no-one has been left behind. SIA training is designed to cover all of these elements.

The doorman’s role, in short, is to make sure that order is maintained on the premises where they work, and the relevant SIA qualifications are intended to see to it that anyone applying for the role of doorman is fully conversant with the way in which this role is upheld. To this end, the SIA training course for a doorman deals with a range of subjects that prepare the individual seeking a qualification to perform the role to its optimum level. This spread of subjects is more extensive than people who believe the old “bouncer” cliché would expect.

The course extends to twenty-eight classroom hours and two hours of exams. The 28 hours of classroom work are split into two halves of fourteen hours, the first unit being entitled “Role and Responsibilities of Door Supervisors in the Security Industry Environment”. This unit deals with all the hypothetical considerations of someone wishing to work as a doorman. Beginning with an introduction to the role, and to the leisure and security industries in which they will work, this part of the course also entails another ten modules, all of which combine to give a full comprehension of the legal requirements, responsibilities and entitlements which fall upon a doorman. These are as follows:

Standards of Behaviour – a lesson in the reasons why standards are important, and an understanding of what the SIA requires in this respect;

Civil and Criminal Law – an understanding of both subjects, the definition of reasonable/ necessary force, the different types of assault and other criminal offences a doorman may have to deal with, and options for action resulting from these;

Searching – a coverage of the reasons and methods for searching individuals and property, entry requirements, the definition of the term “offensive weapon”, the potential hazards of carrying out a search and procedures should an item be found

Arrest – defining why, when and how an arrest should be made, the limitations on a doorman’s powers in this regard and what should result from an arrest

Drugs Awareness – identifying signs of drug misuse, recognising symptoms of drug abuse, listing names of illegal drugs and signs of drug-dealing, procedures for dealing with contravention of drugs policy

Recording Incidents and Crime Scene Protection – why, when and how incidents should be recorded, different types of evidence and how to preserve a crime scene

Licensing Law – knowledge of the law relating to refusal of entry and ejection, police powers, different types of licence and the licensing law as it relates to young people, drunkenness, disorder, prostitution and unlawful gaming

Equal Opportunities – awareness of issues surrounding equality, prejudice and stereotyping, and legal acts to prevent this

Health and Safety – awareness of existing legislation in this area, responsibilities of employer and employee, hazard identification, prevention of injury or AIDS contamination

Emergency Procedures – how to define an emergency, fire safety, bomb scares and first aid procedure

The second part of the course deals with communication skills and conflict resolution – although this is often seen as the doorman’s true job, this unit of the course deals with extraordinary situations which tend to be very rare on an average evening in well-guarded premises – such as violent disorder. SIA training in this respect deals with the theory of conflict prevention.


Drugs Awareness – identifying signs of drug misuse, recognising symptoms of drug abuse, listing names of illegal drugs and signs of drug-dealing, procedures for dealing with contravention of drugs policy

Civil and Criminal Law – an understanding of both subjects, the definition of reasonable/ necessary force, the different types of assault and other criminal offences a doorman may have to deal with, and options for action resulting from these;

Searching – a coverage of the reasons and methods for searching individuals and property, entry requirements, the definition of the term “offensive weapon”, the potential hazards of carrying out a search and procedures should an item be found

Arrest – defining why, when and how an arrest should be made, the limitations on a doorman’s powers in this regard and what should result from an arrest

Drugs Awareness – identifying signs of drug misuse, recognising symptoms of drug abuse, listing names of illegal drugs and signs of drug-dealing, procedures for dealing with contravention of drugs policy

Recording Incidents and Crime Scene Protection – why, when and how incidents should be recorded, different types of evidence and how to preserve a crime scene

Licensing Law – knowledge of the law relating to refusal of entry and ejection, police powers, different types of licence and the licensing law as it relates to young people, drunkenness, disorder, prostitution and unlawful gaming

Equal Opportunities – awareness of issues surrounding equality, prejudice and stereotyping, and legal acts to prevent this

Health and Safety – awareness of existing legislation in this area, responsibilities of employer and employee, hazard identification, prevention of injury or AIDS contamination

Emergency Procedures – how to define an emergency, fire safety, bomb scares and first aid procedure

The second part of the course deals with communication skills and conflict resolution – although this is often seen as the doorman’s true job, this unit of the course deals with extraordinary situations which tend to be very rare on an average evening in well-guarded premises – such as violent disorder. SIA training in this respect deals with the theory of conflict prevention.

For more information on SIA licensing, training or booking a door supervisor course in the UK go to to;
Security Trained - https://www.securitytrained.co.uk


Much of a Door Supervisor’s role is quite straightforward – in the first instance it is about make sure that premise policy and the law on admissions are implimented. This entails turning away people who fail to meet dress code requirements or the venue’s minimum age. For those customers who meet requirements for entry, the door supervisor should greet them politely on their arrival and wish them a good evening on their departure. They also need to see that fire safety requirements, such as maximum occupancy and emergency exits, are stuck to SIA training is directed at seeing that they can do this.

As not all troublemakers are immediately apparent prior to entry, a doorman must also see to it that should trouble increase inside the venue, the people responsible are identified and dealt with in the correct manner, using only force which is necessary, and that those incidents that take place are documented as soon as they are fully dealt with. Company drugs policy and the standard times up period are also within the doorman’s remit, and they also have to ensure that at the end of the evening all customers leave the venue in an safe, calm & orderly fashion, checking the toilets and cloakrooms afterwards to ensure that no-one has been left behind. SIA training is designed to cover all of these elements.

The doorman’s role, in short, is to make sure that order is maintained on the premises where they work, and the relevant SIA qualifications are intended to see to it that anyone applying for the role of doorman is fully conversant with the way in which this role is upheld. To this end, the SIA training course for a doorman deals with a range of subjects that prepare the individual seeking a qualification to perform the role to its optimum level. This spread of subjects is more extensive than people who believe the old “bouncer” cliché would expect.

The course extends to twenty-eight classroom hours and two hours of exams. The 28 hours of classroom work are split into two halves of fourteen hours, the first unit being entitled “Role and Responsibilities of Door Supervisors in the Security Industry Environment”. This unit deals with all the hypothetical considerations of someone wishing to work as a doorman. Beginning with an introduction to the role, and to the leisure and security industries in which they will work, this part of the course also entails another ten modules, all of which combine to give a full comprehension of the legal requirements, responsibilities and entitlements which fall upon a doorman. These are as follows:

Standards of Behaviour – a lesson in the reasons why standards are important, and an understanding of what the SIA requires in this respect;

Civil and Criminal Law – an understanding of both subjects, the definition of reasonable/ necessary force, the different types of assault and other criminal offences a doorman may have to deal with, and options for action resulting from these;

Searching – a coverage of the reasons and methods for searching individuals and property, entry requirements, the definition of the term “offensive weapon”, the potential hazards of carrying out a search and procedures should an item be found

Arrest – defining why, when and how an arrest should be made, the limitations on a doorman’s powers in this regard and what should result from an arrest

Drugs Awareness – identifying signs of drug misuse, recognising symptoms of drug abuse, listing names of illegal drugs and signs of drug-dealing, procedures for dealing with contravention of drugs policy

Recording Incidents and Crime Scene Protection – why, when and how incidents should be recorded, different types of evidence and how to preserve a crime scene

Licensing Law – knowledge of the law relating to refusal of entry and ejection, police powers, different types of licence and the licensing law as it relates to young people, drunkenness, disorder, prostitution and unlawful gaming

Equal Opportunities – awareness of issues surrounding equality, prejudice and stereotyping, and legal acts to prevent this

Health and Safety – awareness of existing legislation in this area, responsibilities of employer and employee, hazard identification, prevention of injury or AIDS contamination

Emergency Procedures – how to define an emergency, fire safety, bomb scares and first aid procedure

The second part of the course deals with communication skills and conflict resolution – although this is often seen as the doorman’s true job, this unit of the course deals with extraordinary situations which tend to be very rare on an average evening in well-guarded premises – such as violent disorder. SIA training in this respect deals with the theory of conflict prevention.

Official SIA

For the official sia website: http://www.sia.homeoffice.gov.uk

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